Nancy Kepple presented at the Society for Social Work and Research conference. She was exploring the Effects of Neighborhood Economic Clustering on Child Maltreatment Rates.

 

The main ideas points were:

-- Growing economic segregation in the United States has neighborhood level consequences for how households are spatially distributed, such as high concentration of affluent or impoverished households within neighborhoods and economic clustering or isolation of these conditions across neighborhoods.

-- Consistent with prior research, local neighborhood concentration of poverty is associated with higher local neighborhood referral rates and substantiation rates.

-- Also consistent with prior research, spatially-lagged neighborhood concentration of poverty is associated with higher local neighborhood referral rates and substantiation rates. Thus, neighborhood areas adjacent to high concentrations may benefit from child maltreatment prevention efforts regardless of local neighborhood conditions.

-- More economically clustered environments are positively associated with higher local neighborhood referral rates. Thus both a high clustering of poverty and a high clustering of affluence increase referral rates.

-- More economically clustered environments are not associated with higher local neighborhood substantiation rates, when controlling for percent Black population and other measures associated with neighborhood social disorder.

-- Future child maltreatment studies should consider exploring spatial dimensions of racial/ethnic concentration and how clustering of economic conditions across neighborhood may influence monitoring networks and reporting norms.

 

Reference:

Kepple, N.J. Exploring the Effects of Neighborhood Economic Clustering on Child Maltreatment Rates